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20121204
20121204
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CNNW 3
CNBC 2
CSPAN 1
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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNBC
Dec 4, 2012 9:00am EST
of the fiscal cliff is already being felt in business planning for next year and 2014. >> even leading up to that, people becoming more conservative. that's had an impact on what the growth will be in '13 all things being equal and we're in danger if this strings out into '13 that you could have problems of what '14 would look like. >> by 2013 if negotiations get strung out, it will impact decision making and whether or not to build a plant or hire people or expand a division or not. >> which we have heard time and again from many of the leaders and many corporations whether they be financial or otherwise. it comes back to this world. certainty. lack of it. and we don't have a lot of certainty at this point. they still have to do business. not as though they won't come in on january 1st and go to work. they are. >> i was thinking, david, could there possibly be any m&a between now and year end? no. >> maybe a little. >> there will be some. you're less likely to make the big move. less likely to make the big move for a variety of reasons. one of them being you don't know how you're going t
CNBC
Dec 4, 2012 1:00pm EST
exclusively with our becky quick on the impact of the fiscal cliff, repercussion does go well into 2014 inside now from one of the best known negotiation experts around, harvard business school professor deepak ma hallow and author of "i moved your cheese" and genius, pleasure to have you here. >> pleasure to be here. >> i you noticed from the notes, you said we begin a negotiation and taking this out of the political context and talk about large-scale negotiations, per say you have to think two steps ahead. why? wh what does that give you? >> if you don't play out the negotiations and see what's going to happen week or month later in the event there is no deal, you're not going to pick the right strategy up front r the current negotiations, for example, both sides thinking about what changes after december 3 11st. if you can look ahead and see things are worse for you in january than now, may want to try earlier to get a deal before it is too late. >> one thing we have noticed a lot of this seems to be playing out in the president coming to the mic, the speaker coming to the mic is that postu
CSPAN
Dec 4, 2012 10:00am EST
in our economy. once we resolve the cliff, we need long-term fiscal reduction so that businesses can climb to the future. to get families and businesses certainty, we must agree in the next few weeks on specific spending cuts and specific revenue increases that reduce the deficit to avoid the fiscal cliff. we should not put off the hard decisions with gimmicks or with triggers. that is what got us here in the first place. it is time to bite the bullet and make the tough decisions and make them now. the first thing we should do is immediately and permanently extend the middle-class tax cuts. this will provide needed certainty to america's families and businesses and markets. this decisive action will ensure millions of american families do not see a tax hike of more than $2,000 starting next month. any agreement must also include a long-term extension of the debt ceiling. america cannot afford another debilitating fiscal showdown. has to be a package deal. then we need to enact a long term and, granted the solution. the most serious plan to recommend $4 trillion in deficit reductions
CNN
Dec 3, 2012 5:00pm PST
parts of the proposals to avert that fiscal cliff will really have. tonight we tackle the much-discussed concept of increasing tax rates for the top 2%. chief business correspondent ali velshi joins me now. help us cut through the spin. the partisans all have a different take on this. if you raise taxes on the top 2%, what's the impact? what does it look like and how much of an impact would it have on the deficit? >> well, let's look at it in two ways. one is income tax, right? right now, the highest earners, those households that earn more than a quarter million dollars a year, pay a higher tax rate on the marginal amount, the amount above the $250,000 a year. so we're talking about taking that rate from 36% to 39.6% if we even go there. that hasn't even been negotiated yet but that's 3.6% on every dollar you earn above $250,000. there are not a lot of studies that suggest that that would have catastrophic effects on the economy. the other area that democrats want to raise taxes are on investment income, things like capital gains, dividend income. now, those will jump signific
CNN
Dec 4, 2012 6:00am PST
, then they're going to risk the whole economy in going over the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's sustainable. i don't think people fully understand, what the president is saying is 100% of american families and small businesses get continued tax relief on their first $250,000 in income, and on the income above that amount, higher income people would be paying the same rates they did during the clinton administration, which is four more cents on the dollar. and, again, i don't think that's at all unreasonable. the president talked about this at length during the presidential campaign, and i believe -- i think people like tom cole, a conservative republican in oklahoma had it right when he warned his colleagues they would look totally obstructionist if they allowed that to happen. >> congressman, also included in the president's plan was that $200 billion in new stimulus measures. mention the word stimulus to republicans, and, well, they're not too happy with that word. so why do that? why deliberately like -- it seems like it was a deliberate poke in the side. >> no, carol. this
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)